Glossary of Vacuum Cleaner Terms

/Glossary of Vacuum Cleaner Terms
Glossary of Vacuum Cleaner Terms2018-04-19T01:21:46+00:00

Air Watts
The amount of this power that is converted into airflow at the end of the cleaning hose is sometimes stated, and is measured in air watts: the units are simply watts; “air” is used to clarify that this is output power, not input electrical power..

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ETL Listed Mark 
ETL Listed Mark indicates that our product has been tested by Intertek (an indepented third party), found in compliance with accepted national standards, and meets the minimal requirements required for sale or distribution. The ETL Mark is assurance that the product is compliant with safety standards, having been tested and certified by a third-party organization.

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Green Label Certified 
To earn the CRI (The Carpet & Rug Insitute) Seal of Approval/Green Label certification, vacuums must pass the following independent laboratory tests. Soil removal – CRI uses NASA-enhanced x-ray fluorescence technology instead of traditional gravimetrix testing to measure the precise amount of soil removed from carpet – either 30 oz/sy commercial cut pile carpet or 30 oz/sy loop pile carpet. Dust containment – The vacuum must not release more than 100 micrograms of dust particles per cubic meter of air, keeping dirt and dust locked tight in the vacuum – not escaping back into the air where it can be breathed. Carpet fiber retention – The vacuum must not affect the texture of the commercial cut pile carpet (900 passes with sample rotated every 50 passes) more than a one-step change based on one year of normal vacuum use.

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HEPA 
HEPA (High Efficiency Particulate Air) is a filtering efficiency specification for filters. A HEPA filter must be capable of capturing 99.97% of all particles as small as 0.3 micrometers (formerly microns) in size from the air which flows through it. The phrase “as small as” means that if all particles were that small, it would still have that efficiency. This should not be confused with the phrase “down to” which may mean a mixture of particle sizes for the stated efficiency.

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Static Lift
Static lift measures the ability to keep the air moving under a load. Static lift is measured in inches. It can be equated to torque on a motor. If a vacuum has 80″ of lift, it means it can lift a column of water 80″ off the ground. When a filter is loaded up with fine dust, it becomes more difficult to pull air through the pores. A vacuum that delivers 120CFM with 90″ of lift will continue to pull a large volume of air through the filter whereas a vacuum that delivers 120CFM with 40″ of lift will tend to see a substantial drop in the CFM pulled through the hose. This will result in loss of efficiency for the dust collector.

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